Print Friendly and PDF

Dispatches from Nagasaki No.26

Sixth Nagasaki Global Citizens’ Assembly for Elimination of Nuclear Weapons (Nagasaki City, November 16-18, 2018)

Background

Two recent events have given hope and encouragement to us members of civil society – an adoption of the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons (TPNW) (July 2017) and a conferral of the Nobel Peace Prize to the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons (ICAN).

And, on the Korean peninsula, where tensions still ran high last year, two inter-Korea summit meetings kindled hopes for “denuclearization and a path to peace,” after which a historically groundbreaking US-DPRK summit meeting in Singapore bolster prospects for denuclearization together with a formal end to the Korean War. Such developments present an excellent opportunity for Japan and other regional players to establish a Northeast Asia Nuclear Weapon-Free Zone (NEA-NWFZ).

This said, on a global perspective, the general outlook for nuclear disarmament is deteriorating. Here, a number of developments portend increasing instability. First, leaders in the US are calling for a Nuclear Posture Review that would seek to expand the role of nuclear weapons by developing/deploying smaller, more “usable” nuclear weapons. Second, the US has also declared that it will no longer abide by the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (the Iran nuclear deal), earlier crafted to limit the Iranian nuclear program. And third, the US has stated its intention to fully abandon the Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces (INF) Treaty, a historically significant arms control agreement reached with the Soviet Union in 1987.

One main theme of this assembly is that now is the time to follow on the momentum of the TPNW and the ICAN Novel Prize conferral as we strive to attain a world without nuclear weapons. This is an international assembly, the first such convocation in five years, one hosted by the people of Nagasaki together with their representatives in the Nagasaki municipal and prefectural governments. The assembly welcomed researchers and specialists from Japan and around the world, the Director of Arms Control and Disarmament Division at the Japan Ministry of Foreign Affairs (MOFA), no less than 12 representatives of leading NGOs, and 17 college students: two from the US, five from Malaysia, five from China, and five from South Korea. Together we listened to a keynote speech before breaking down into four workshops, where we separately discussed issues toward the creation of a world without nuclear weapons before regathering to present our conclusions to all. The assembly extended over three days and entailed the participation of 3,500 private citizens, college students, and even schoolchildren. The full program can be followed with the links below.

1. Keynote speech: Professor Mitsuru Kurosawa, Osaka Jogakuin College

Professor Kurosawa stressed the importance of centering the security of global citizens on the denuclearization movement. His approach was broad and encompassing. He pointed out the conceptual framework for security arrangements is showing signs of changing, of shifting from one centered on the security of nation states and, as an extension of that, the international community, to one centered on security of individuals and, as an extension of that, the community of mankind. With the TPNW, he said, we strip such weapons of their legitimacy, we stigmatize them. He concluded that the global trend of the antinuclear weapon movement is now toward broadening the scale of such legal efforts and, under the NPT framework, to advance both treaties together, not under a spirit of confrontation but rather of comprehensiveness. The participants were able to gain a real sense that the actions of those of us in Nagasaki, the site of an atomic bombing, who have continued with this Assembly over the past 18 years with a sense of being global citizens, are indeed starting to finally reach the new concept of security.

2. Workshop I: Progress in peace talks and denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula – the future of Northeast Asia without nuclear weapons (seven panelists)

The inter-Korea Summit led to the Panmunjom Declaration and the Pyongyang Declaration, which promise a formal end to the Korean War, a framework for peace across the Korean peninsula, and an abandonment of the nuclear ambitions of the North Korea. All panelists welcomed this. Representatives of South Korea, China, Russia, the US, Germany, Mongolia and Japan next exchanged a variety of opinions as to how such promises could be turned into reality. Professor Tatsujiro Suzuki, RECNA Director, pointed out that this offers us an opportunity to draw within range of our targets for peace on and denuclearization of the peninsula, and to realize an NEA-NWFZ, including Japan. The emergence of the NEA-NWFZ, as well as the existing nuclear weapon-free zones in the northern hemisphere (Central Asian Nuclear Weapon Free Zone running through five countries in central Asia, Mongolian Nuclear-Weapons-Free Status) would do much to encourage global denuclearization on a global scale. Furthermore, if the three predominant nuclear powers in the region (the US, China and Russia) would offer negative security assurances, that too would do much to further the development of international security arrangements. It would also present Japan with an opportunity to abandon the US nuclear umbrella. Participants specializing in nuclear disarmament next made some good points about conditions (establishment of a system of verification; etc.) for North Korean denuclearization.

Workshop Ⅱ : Carrying on the legacy of hibakusha – learning from, and transmitting, the thoughts of nuclear victims (four panelists)

Hibakusha have long called for the complete elimination of nuclear weapons. And here, to continue to promote denuclearization into the future, we must transmit this fervor to the next generation. We invited Ms. Kathleen Sullivan, whose award-winning book, Nagasaki: Life after Nuclear War (Penguin Books, 2016), has had a significant social impact, to join us. Ms. Sullivan is from the US, which is regarded as the leader of the nuclear weapon states. She nonetheless has been very active in citizen movements over the years and here, at the assembly, participated in vigorous discussions with hibakusha and, in cases, their grandchildren. First-hand accounts by these and other hibakusha had an especially strong impact on participants from overseas. Also felt was the importance of creating a network capable of passing on these lessons to a broad international audience.

This workshop was comprised of two parts, with the second being a “transmittal salon,” within which representatives of a number of peace/antinuclear civic organizations introduced themselves and their activities, exchanged views on various initiatives, and discussed activities and prospects for the future. To effect this transmittal, cited was the importance of media, such as photographs, music, movies, and anime. Participants were encouraged by the enthusiasm for nuclear disarmament displayed by their younger colleagues, many of whom have started peace-related educational or political programs under their own initiative.

Workshop Ⅲ : Building a world without nuclear weapons with future generations

University students from Nagasaki, Tokyo and other areas of Japan joined local citizens and overseas students -to discuss the results of a survey on attitudes toward initiatives to build a future without nuclear weapons. Approximately 150 people participated in this workshop, breaking off into groups of five or six to discuss various issues and arrive at conclusions for presentation to the other groups.

The survey was carried out over SNSs (social networking services) and on a fairly large scale, entailing the cooperation of nearly 1,000 students (half high school, half college). A full 80% of respondents expressed an interest in the abolition of nuclear weapons; and nearly 85% said that they consider a nuclearfree world to be an attainable goal. These results were heartening to assembly participants. On the other hand, as for actively participating in the movement, many respondents expressed a lack of interest, a reluctance to get involved, and a need to avoid standing out as a radical with upcoming job hunts in the near future. All told, about 30% expressed an intent to actively participate, and only 47% said the Japanese government should immediately sign a petition calling for a ratification of the TPNW (among Nagasaki students, though, the affirmation rate was 59%). About 20% of all respondents (12% of Nagasaki respondents) felt such action would be premature. A fairly high percentage (30%) said they considered Japan to be under the protection of the US nuclear umbrella. Japanese young people thus show a fairly high degree of interest in nuclear issues but are hindered from participating in related movements by a variety of obstacles. Here, many groups pointed out the necessity of a network to widely share information/knowledge and tie it into action. This is a very important conclusion, one of much significance with regards to devising ways to raise the level of nuclear consciousness/awareness among members of the next generation of Japanese as they strive to attain a nuclear free world. Here, the core Nagasaki group proposed the formation of a nationwide “Youth Network for Peace” promote nuclear disarmament educational programs and political actions. A majority of the working groups expressed their agreement with this proposition.

Participants from the US, a nuclear state, reported that young people in that country generally share this view. They spoke of the necessity of stoking a broadbased movement within the US society toward the attainment of a future free of nuclear weapons. Participants from Asian countries beyond Japan also expressed active support for a nuclear-free world, demonstrating that a consensus is taking shape among the young people of the world. Particularly touching was a tearful vow by a participant from Malaysia as she cited the pain and suffering of hibakusha victims.

Workshop Ⅳ: Achieving a world without nuclear weapons – the NPT framework and the role of the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons (five panelists)

This workshop was particularly notable for vigorous debate under the direction of five distinguished panelists – Mr. Nobuhara Imanishi, Director of the Arms Control and Disarmament Division, MOFA; Mr. Daniel Högsta, Campaign Coordinator, ICAN; Dr. Tariq Rauf, a Canadian expert on nuclear disarmament and a member of the Group of Eminent Persons for Substantive Advancement of Nuclear Disarmament; Ms. Masako Toki, a nonproliferation expert active in the US; and Ms. Jacqueline Cabasso, executive director of a US-based NPO.

After half a century, the NPT regime has reached a stalemate and the TPNW was adopted. Amid this, a split is widening between, on one hand, nuclear states and the countries dependent on them for their security (e.g., Japan), which give first priority to national/international security, and, on the other hand, nonnuclear states and civil movements (e.g., ICAN), which give first priority to the security of humanity and global citizens in general. Amid this split, many participants spoke of a need for civil society to work toward the codification of international norms of behavior.

It is the position of the Japanese government that Japan, via a Group of Eminent Persons established with the MOFA, must work to bridge the gap between these two camps. Director Imanishi touched upon this point, which comes amid the Japanese government’s refusal to endorse the TPNW. Ms. Toki stressed the importance of nuclear disarmament related education in empowering the young people of the world as they strive to attain a world free of nuclear weapons. She also presented an overview of the current state of such education in the US. While the US Federal government may strongly oppose to any sort of the TPNW, there is a move to collect signatures at the local state level to compel congressional representatives to push the central government in that direction.

Dr. Rauf, a member of the MOFA’s Group of Eminent Persons, spoke of the necessity of bridge-building on the part of the Japanese government and of the importance of comprehensively managing the TPNW within the NPT framework (two points in common with the keynote speech). The NPT and TPNW should not be acting in opposition, he said, but rather should supplement each other toward the shared goal of denuclearization. He stressed the importance of having both camps maintain a common, cooperative orientation toward this goal, and participants expressed their wish for the Japanese government to take bridgebuilding actions to facilitate this.

Within an open debate, Director Imanishi emphasized that the Japanese government is not dead-set against the TPNW. He explained that once certain conditions are met (including, for one, a favorable turn in various international disputes of relevance to nuclear threats) and nuclear weapon stockpiles are reduced to an acceptably low level, MOFA would consider the TPNW as a necessary last step toward the attainment of a nuclear-free world. A statement on this level is something new from MOFA, and we think highly of it.

Japan’s so-called “nuclear dilemma” – maintaining the goal of nuclear weapons abolition while depending on the US nuclear umbrella – has been deepening. As above, the Japanese government has established a Group of Eminent Persons for Substantive Advancement of Nuclear Disarmament, which is to serve as a “bridge-builder” between the nuclear-armed/nuclearumbrella states and the states not possessing nuclear weapons. Although this is a positive step, the Japanese government has yet to make any effective recommendations to that end. On the contrary, as Japan stands in opposition to the TPNW, it seems to have lost its way on nuclear disarmament and non-proliferation policy.

Recently developed as a special project is “What’s Peace Like?,” a unique attempt intended to get children thinking about peace, to make them familiar with what it means and appreciative of its importance. This new avenue toward peace education, which takes the form of picture books and stories, was revealed for the first time here at the assembly.

Nagasaki Appeal

A final draft of the Nagasaki Appeal was adopted upon considerable discussion and debate over a committee draft (link below). To depart from an earlier reliance on security as viewed on a nation state level to a new emphasis on security as viewed the level of global citizens, of people as individuals, including the majority who do not live in nuclear armed countries, we confirmed the heavy responsibility borne by states that do possess nuclear weapons, affirmed the importance of ratifying the TPNW and of maintaining its complementariness with the NPT, and concluded the assembly by calling on the Japanese government to ratify the TPNW.

・Nagasaki Global Citizens’ Assembly for Elimination of Nuclear Weapons website: http://ngo-nagasaki.com/

 

第6回核廃絶地球市民集会ナガサキ (長崎市2018.11.16-18)

開催の背景

2017年7月の核兵器禁止条約(核禁条約)の歴史的成立と、それに続く核兵器廃絶国際キャンペーン(ICAN)のノーベル平和賞受賞はわれわれ市民社会に大きな希望を与えてくれた。

加えて、昨年末まで緊張の連続であった朝鮮半島では、2回の南北朝鮮の首脳会談によって「平和構築と非核化」への展望が拡がり、シンガポールにおける歴史的米朝首脳会談は、さらに朝鮮戦争の終結と「非核化」への展望を抱かせた。今こそ、日本を含む「北東アジア非核兵器地帯」の設立にむけて絶好の機会が到来している。

しかし、現在の地球規模の核軍縮状況は悪化傾向にある。第一に、米国は核兵器の役割を増大させ、より「使いやすい」小型核兵器の開発と配備を明確にした「核態勢の見直し」を発表、第二に、米国はイランとの核合意「共同包括実施計画」をもはや履行しないことを言明、第三に、歴史的意義のあるロシアとの中距離核戦力(INF)全廃条約を破棄する意図を公表した。これらは今後の核情勢の不安定要因となりうる。

本集会は「核禁条約とICANのノーベル平和賞受賞を力とし、核兵器のない世界をこの手に」ということをメインテーマに、長崎の市民と自治体(長崎県・市)の合同による5年ぶりの国際会議である。海外から核問題の専門家および研究者、外務省軍縮担当官、NGO代表ら12名と大学生ら17名(米国2、マレーシア5、中国5、韓国5)を招き、基調講演と4つの分科会において、今後の核なき世界の実現の方策について活発な発表と討論が行われた。3日間の全プログラム(下記ホームページにリンク)には延べ3500名の市民、学生、子供たちが参加する大集会となった。

1.基調講演:大阪女学院大学 黒澤 満 教授

これからの世界は地球市民の安全保障を中心にすえて核軍縮を進めることが重要であることを強調され、きわめて広い展望に富む講演であった。安全保障の概念に変化の兆しがあることを指摘され、国家の安全保障とその延長線上の国際安全保障を中心におく考え方から、個人の安全保障を基盤に人類レベルの安全保障に世界の視点が変りつつあることを強調された。核禁条約によって核兵器を非正当化し、核兵器に汚名を着せることにより、その法的規範化を推し進め、NPT体制のもとで、対立ではなく包括的に両条約を運用することが今後の世界の流れになると結論された。被爆地長崎において、地球市民を自覚して本集会を過去18年間にわたり継続してきたわれわれの活動がまさに新しい安全保障の概念にまで到達しつつあることを参加者は実感することができた。

2.分科会1:朝鮮半島の平和と非核化の進展 北東アジアの核なき未来(パネリスト7名)

南北朝鮮の首脳会談で出された板門店宣言、平壌宣言により朝鮮戦争の終結と半島の平和構築の将来が約束され、北朝鮮の核政策の破棄も約束されたことを受け、全員のパネリストがこれを歓迎した。韓国、中国、ロシア、米国、ドイツ、モンゴル、日本の代表的専門家から、その実現のための方策について種々の意見がだされた。朝鮮半島の平和構築と非核化という目標が具体的に視野に入ってきた今をチャンスととらえ、日本を含むさらに広域の北東アジア地域の非核化、すなわち非核兵器地帯構想がRECNAセンター長の鈴木達治郎氏から提案された。北半球に現存する中央アジア5カ国とモンゴルの非核地帯(地位)にくわえ北東アジア非核兵器地帯が実現すると、世界規模の核軍縮への影響も大きい。この地域を取り巻く3大核兵器国(米中ロ)を含む核兵器国による消極的安全保障が担保されれば、国際的安全保障体制にも大きな進展をもたらすことになる。日本も米国の核の傘を解消するチャンスとなろう。核軍縮の専門家からは北朝鮮の非核化の条件(検証等)の整備について重要な指摘があった。

分科会2:被爆の継承~ヒバクシャの想いに学び・伝える~(パネリスト4名)

核兵器の完全廃絶を願う原爆被爆者の積年の思いを、今後次々に生まれてくる世代にいかにして着実に継承するかは、核軍縮運動を途切れなく継続する上で必須である。核兵器国のリーダーともいえる米国から、市民運動に長年携わってきたキャサリン・サリバンさんと2016年に「Nagasaki:Life after Nuclear War」を米国で出版し大きな反響をまき起こし種々の賞を受けたスーザン・サザードさんを招き、被爆者と被爆3世の若者が加わり活発な議論が展開された。被爆者の方の迫真の体験証言は強い衝撃を海外からの出席者に与えた。今後は世界的な広がりのある継承活動のネットワーク作りが重要であることが確認された。

この分科会では第2部として「被爆継承サロン」が開催され、平和や核廃絶に取り組んでいる多数の市民団体が参加して活動を紹介し合い、今後の運動のあり方と展望について意見交換が行われた。継承の方法としては、写真、音楽、映画、アニメなどの映像を含む方法の重要性が多くの参加者から指摘された。その中でも特に、若い世代が核軍縮により積極的に取り組み、自らの力で平和教育や運動を始めていることは本当に勇気づけられる。

分科会3:次世代とつくる核なき世界

海外からの大学生に加え地元長崎および東京などからも参加した大学生によって、自主企画のアンケート調査の結果についての討論を行った。若者が核なき世界を実現するうえで取り組むべき課題について市民を加えた約150名が、5~6名ずつのグループに分かれ討論し、グループごとの提案を発表し合った。

SNSを使った1000名(大学生と高校生ほぼ500名ずつ)を超える大規模のアンケート調査では、学生たちの間においては核廃絶に対する関心は80%、核なき世界の実現の可能性はほぼ85%と高い結果であった。これらの結果は参加者に大きな感銘を与えた。一方、実際に自ら運動に参加するかという問いについては、無関心から、躊躇する、就職活動などで周囲の目を意識することがあるなど答えは分散し、積極的に参加する意思のある人は30%程度にとどまった。核禁条約に直ちに署名すべきとする意見は47%にとどまった。ただし長崎県の学生では59%と高かった。時期尚早とする意見も20%(県内12%)程度あった。日本が米国の核の傘に守られている意識は30%とかなり高い。このように日本の若者の核に関する意識はかなり高いことが浮き彫りとなったが、運動に参加することについては種々の課題があり、情報と知識を広く共有して行動に結びつけるためのネットワークの必要性が多くのグループから提案された。今後の日本社会を担う世代における核なき世界の実現に対する当事者意識をさらに高め、行動するためにはいかなる方策が取り得るかを考える上できわめて重要な討論結果と言える。その結果長崎のコアグループから核軍縮教育と核廃絶運動の全国的「ユースネットワーク・フォア・ピース」を創設すべきであるという提案がなされ賛成多数で分科会の結論となった。

核兵器国の米国の学生からもほほ同じような米国の若い世代の意識についての現状報告があり、米国社会の中に広がりを持った核なき世界を目指す機運を高める必要性が強調された。アジアの学生からも核なき世界を目指す積極的な意見が出され、若者世代に共通的な基盤が形成されつつあることがうかがわれる。マレーシアの女子学生からは、被爆者が受けた苦痛と苦難の人生に対して、涙ながらの同情の気持ちと核なき世界を目指す決意表明があり、感動的であった。

分科会4:核兵器なき世界の実現を目指す;NPT体制と核兵器禁止条約の役割(パネリスト5名)

外務省からも今西靖治軍備管理軍縮課長が出席され、ICANのコーディネーター ダニエル・ホグスタ氏、カナダの核軍縮専門家で賢人会議メンバーでもあるタリク・ラウフ氏、米国の核軍縮教育専門家の土岐雅子氏、米国のNGO代表のジャクリーン・カバッソー氏らにより活発な議論が繰り広げられた。

50年目を迎えたNPT体制が行き詰まる中、禁止条約が成立し、国家および国際の安全保障を優先させる核兵器国および核依存国(日本など)側と、人間および地球市民の安全保障を重視する非核兵器国およびICANなどの市民運動体側の分断が深まりつつあるが、発効、および今後の国際規範化も視野に入れて、市民社会は努力するべきとする意見が多く出された。

日本政府のかたくなな核禁条約拒否の姿勢は、今回の今西課長の発表でも踏襲されたが、外務省が設置した賢人会議で検討されつつある両陣営の分断の間に立って、日本が橋渡し策を実行していく必要性を強調した。核軍縮教育の重要性がこれからの若い世代による核なき世界の追求と実現には不可欠であることも土岐雅子氏から強調され、米国における軍縮教育の現状報告があった。核禁条約に真正面から反対する米国政府に対しても、各州の地方自治体では議会において政府に核禁条約への署名を求める動きが拡がりつつある現状も報告された。

外務省賢人会議メンバーの一人であるタリク・ラウフ氏も日本政府の橋渡しの重要性とNPT体制において核禁条約を包括的に運用することの重要性を指摘した(基調講演と共通)。NPTと核禁条約は相反するものではなく、今後の核軍縮の進展には両条約を相互補完的に運用して、核軍縮の進展を両陣営が一致協力して目指す方向性が重要であり、その意味で日本の橋渡し役に期待が表明された。また総合討論で、今西課長が日本政府も核禁条約を鼻から全面否定している訳ではなく、核を巡る国際紛争の好転など一定の条件が整い、実際の核兵器の削減が最小レベルまでに到達した暁には、核なき世界を目指す最終段階に向けて核禁条約が必須となるものと外務省も考えていることを明言された点は、これまでにはなかった踏み込んだ発言として評価できる。

「核のジレンマ」(「核兵器廃絶の目標」と「核の傘依存」)がますます深まりつつある日本政府は、核保有国・「核の傘」国と非核保有国の間にあって「橋渡し役」を果たすために「核軍縮の実質的な進展のための賢人会議」を設置したが、これは建設的な一歩ではあるが、日本政府はいまだにそのための効果的な提言を出していない。それどころか、日本政府は核禁条約反対の立場をとっているため、核軍縮・不拡散政策で方向性を見失っているかのようだ。

この他にも、特別企画として、子供たちを対象とする「平和ってどんなこと?」という非常にユニークな新しい試みもなされ、子供のうちから平和の考え方に慣れ親しむことの重要性と、その方法について絵本という、言葉と絵という媒体による新たらしい平和教育の芽生えが今回の集会で初めて実現した。

長崎アピール

アピール起草委員会が用意した原案が審議され、種々の意見が表明され、討論のあと最終案が採択された(下記の集会ホームページからリンク)。国家安全保障と国際安全保障という国レベルの思考法から脱却し、個々の人間の安全保障にもとづく地球市民(Global Citizens)の安全保障には、最大多数の非核兵器側の国民も含め、核兵器国側には重大な責任があることを確認して、今後の核禁条約の発効の実現とNPT条約との補完的運用の重要性および日本政府への核禁条約署名の要望を行って閉会した。

核廃絶地球市民集会ナガサキホームページ:http://ngo-nagasaki.com/

 

このページのトップへ

    • J-PAND
    • RECNA叢書
    • 世界の核弾頭データ
    • 世界の核物質データ
    • 市民データベース
    • ナガサキ・ユース代表団
    • 日韓共同ワークショップ20190522
    • Panel on Peace and Security of Northeast Asia
    • 北東アジア非核兵器地帯への包括的アプローチ
    • Monitor BLOG
    • ニューズレター
    • Dispatches from Nagasaki
    • レクナの目

  • 核兵器廃絶長崎連絡協議会
  • 核兵器廃絶市民講座
  • RECNAアクセス