Print Friendly and PDF

Dispatches from Nagasaki No.22

Japan’s UNGA Resolution on Nuclear Disarmament

This year the Japanese government once again submitted to the UN General Assembly its Draft Resolution on Nuclear Disarmament, which was duly adopted. This marks the 24th consecutive year that Japan has submitted such a draft resolution. The draft resolution gained overwhelming support, including even the nuclear states of the US and UK, with 156 nations in favor, 4 against and 24 abstentions. Compared to last year’s result (167 in favor, 4 against and 16 abstentions), while those nations against the motion remained unchanged those in favor declined, their votes switching the abstainers. Looking back at the votes over the past decade, out of the ten votes the support of 170 or more nations was obtained on six occasions, and the number did not once fall behind the 160-vote mark. Neither did the number of abstainers exceed 20 nations. Little surprise then that the Nagasaki Shimbun carried the headline “Support for nuclear abolition proposal drops” in the October 28, 2017 edition.

Citing the reasons for this decline the Nagasaki Shimbun quoted from the interpretation made by the Kyodo Press Agency that the failure of the Japanese government’s resolution to mention the U.N. Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons passed in July, and the watering down of the wording of the text related to the inhumanity of nuclear weapons had created an impression that Japan’s stance on nuclear disarmament has receded (Nagasaki Shimbun, October 28 edition). In fact, nations such as Austria, New Zealand, Costa Rica and Nigeria, that supported the resolution last year and also signed the U.N. Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons, decided to abstain.

The Japanese government has long proudly insisted that it should bridge the gap between the nuclear and non-nuclear nations. However, this year’s draft resolution was considerably watered down compared to last year’s. In particular, the removal of the word “any” from the text that last year read “the catastrophic humanitarian consequences of any use of nuclear weapons” hints that, although the use of nuclear weapons still raises humanitarian concerns, it could be open to the interpretation that exceptional use of nuclear weapons could be tolerated on humanitarian grounds. It was thus that RECNA director Tatsujiro Suzuki fiercely criticized the government in the October 20 edition of the Nagasaki Shimbun, saying: “It would hardly be surprising if the right of the Japanese government to talk about the abolition of nuclear weapons is called into question.”

Speaking of the decision to award the 2017 Nobel Peace Prize to the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons (ICAN), Japan’s Foreign Minister, Taro Kono, issued a statement saying that: “The Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons that ICAN has supported is a different approach from that of the Japanese government, but we share the same goal of nuclear abolition. We will rebuild a relationship of trust between the nuclear and non-nuclear states and non-nuclear states in different security environments, and resolutely stick to the task of gaining the involvement of the nuclear states in a realistic and practical manner.” However, this year’s Japanese draft resolution contains no new concrete suggestions towards the disarmament or abolition of nuclear weapons, and it would be extremely difficult to describe it as offering an alternative approach to the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons that the government is rejecting. Indeed, it is perfectly natural that nations calling for the same abolition of nuclear weapons have turned against Japan, which feebly calls for a “realistic approach” without even trying to show a persuasive alternative course of action, and is utterly uncooperative in the pursuit of nuclear disarmament on the grounds of a difficult security environment and its perceived need for nuclear deterrence. Meanwhile, fierce criticism of the Japanese government is being voiced in the atomic bombing site of Nagasaki.

However, there is still a large number of nations that support both the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons and the Japanese government’s draft resolution. While Japan still maintains the trust of these nations, if it is unable to put forward specific proposals for nuclear disarmament instead of listing all the issues in East Asia and emphasizing how they currently make nuclear disarmament impossible, Japan will inevitably be told that is no longer a nation “bridging” between the nuclear and non-nuclear states.

 

日本提出「核廃絶決議案」の波紋

今年も日本政府は国連総会にいわゆる「核廃絶決議案」を提出し、可決された。これで日本は24年連続で国連総会に「核廃絶決議案」を提案したことになる。決議案自体は核兵器国である米英を含め、圧倒的多数の支持を得て(賛成156、反対4、棄権24)であった。これは昨年の採択結果、賛成167、反対4、棄権16に比べると、反対は変わらないものの、賛成が減り、その分棄権が増加している。過去10年を振り返ってみると、10回の内、6回は170ヵ国以上の賛成を得ており、賛成国が160を下回ることは無かった。また、棄権が20ヵ国を超えたことも無かったのである。このような状況の下で、長崎新聞が「核廃絶決議案支持減少」(2017年10月28日)と報じたのは無理もないことである。

その理由として、長崎新聞は、ニューヨーク発の共同通信電を引き、今年日本が提案した決議案が7月に国連で採択された核兵器禁止条約に言及せず、また核兵器の非人道性に関する表現も昨年に比べてトーンダウンした等の理由を挙げ、核軍縮に対する立場が後退したとの印象を与えた結果であると報じている(長崎新聞、10月28日)。実際に昨年は日本の提出した決議案に賛成したオーストリア、ニュージーランド、コスタリカ、ナイジェリアなど、核兵器禁止条約交渉を推進した国々が棄権にまわる結果となっている。

日本政府は、常々日本の立場を核兵器保有国と非核兵器国との間の「橋渡し」であるべきと主張してきた。しかし、日本の「核兵廃絶決議案」が昨年までと比べても大幅にトーンダウンし、特に「核兵器のあらゆる使用がもたらす壊滅的な人道上の結末」から「あらゆる」を削除したことで、核兵器の使用は一般的に人道上の深刻な問題をはらんでいるとしても、人道上例外的に許容される核兵器の使用があるとも解釈できる余地を作ったことに対し、RECNAの鈴木センター長は「(日本政府は)核廃絶を語る資格を疑われても仕方ない」と厳しく批判した。(長崎新聞、10月20日)

河野外務大臣は、12月10日に核兵器廃絶国際キャンペーン(ICAN)のノーベル平和賞受賞に際し、「ICANが推進した核兵器禁止条約は,日本政府のアプローチとは異なりますが,核廃絶というゴールは共有しています。」、「核兵器国と非核兵器国,安全保障環境の異なる非核兵器国の間の信頼関係を再構築し,核兵器国もしっかり巻き込む形で現実的かつ実践的な取組を粘り強く進めていく」という談話を発表したが、今回の日本の決議には核兵器の具体的な削減や廃絶へ向けての新しい提案が含まれているわけではなく、日本が反対している核兵器禁止条約に替わる核兵器廃絶へのアプローチを示すものであるとは到底言い難い。「現実的なアプローチ」を謳いながら説得力のある代替案を示そうともせず、厳しい安全保障環境と核抑止の必要性を理由に核軍縮の推進に非協力的な日本に対し、同じ「核兵器廃絶」というゴールを掲げる国々からの支持が減少したのは、むしろ当然のことであり、被爆地長崎からも強い批判の声があがっているのである。

しかし、核兵器禁止条約を支持している国々からもまだ日本の決議に賛成している国も少ないわけではない。それらの国々がまだ日本に対する信頼を残しているうちに、東アジアの抱える問題を羅列することで今核軍縮ができない理由を強調するのではなく、具体的に核軍縮を進めるための提案を提示できなければ、到底「橋渡し役」など務まるものではないと言わなければならない。

 

このページのトップへ

    • J-PAND
    • RECNA叢書
    • 世界の核弾頭データ
    • 世界の核物質データ
    • 市民データベース
    • ナガサキ・ユース代表団
    • 日韓共同ワークショップ20190522
    • Panel on Peace and Security of Northeast Asia
    • 北東アジア非核兵器地帯への包括的アプローチ
    • Monitor BLOG
    • ニューズレター
    • Dispatches from Nagasaki
    • レクナの目

  • 核兵器廃絶長崎連絡協議会
  • 核兵器廃絶市民講座
  • RECNAアクセス